Browsing Clergy Notes 1996-2001 by Title

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  • Unknown author (2000-09)
    Many in the clergy are reluctant to advertise in secular media, though lay people are generally more open to the idea. Culture and even theology will determine whether advertising is appropriate for a particular congregation. ...
  • Unknown author (2000-05)
    New congregations are springing up-sometimes as an off-shoot of established congregations-aimed at members of the so-called Generation X. The services feature guitar-driven music and a conversational preaching style.
  • Unknown author (1999-02)
    Scholars use the term declension to describe the deterioration or declining influence of an organization or institution. The theme of declension…encourages the tendency to pay more attention to what religion is not doing ...
  • Unknown author (1999-10)
    In this issue, we explore how the public role of clergy has changed over this century. Sometimes that change has been shaped by congregations who expect their clergy to be hands on managers and leaders. Community building ...
  • Diamond, Etan; Farnsley, Arthur E. II (1997-05)
    Like a photograph, a survey provides a snapshot of people’s attitudes or behaviors at a single point in time. It often reveals little about the past and how those attitudes have changed. Only by comparing different surveys ...
  • Unknown author (1998-12)
    As a child, I was brought up with Bible maps that plotted in huge squiggles Abraham’s wanderings through the ancient Near East. The community which Abraham and Sarah drew around them seems a model for our contemporary ...
  • Unknown author (2000-07)
    The principle of church-state separation has banished religion from the schools in its overt forms. Still, religion has played a crucial role in the shaping of culture, and there are opportunities for clergy to share their ...
  • Unknown author (1997-06)
    Congregations of all sorts have been in the volunteer business a long time. Polis researchers have found that the volunteers congregations recruit are mainly for the educational, administrative and liturgical programs of ...
  • Unknown author (1996-11)
    Are we becoming a nation of loners? Yes, claims sociologist Robert Putnam in his essay "Bowling Alone."
  • Unknown author (1999-01)
    While many congregations own computers, few benefit fully from their capabilities. How important are these "indispensable" machines to you?
  • Unknown author (1999-09)
    In this issue, you'll read that the average congregation sponsors or houses at least four different community programs. Others argue this "average congregation" scenario (as determined by one national study) is a bit misleading.
  • Unknown author (1998-02)
    An interview with David Bodenhamer, Director of The Polis Center. The conversation centered on research being conducted by the Center for its Project on Religion and Urban Culture.
  • Unknown author (2000-10)
    As clergy approach middle age, they often find that they need to recharge their vocational batteries, if they are to avoid burn-out. Continuing education courses for clergy afford them the chance to reconnect with their ...
  • Unknown author (1999-04)
    Whether beginning a daycare or creating a sense of partnership within a neighborhood, we clergy often lament the lack of money, volunteers, or technical assistance necessary to carry out community ministries. Recent studies ...
  • Unknown author (1999-11)
    In this issue of Clergy Notes, we introduce you to some of the measurements that local clergy are using to evaluate their neighborhood and community. Some turn to the information eager to attract new members. Others consider ...
  • Unknown author (1999-07)
    In this issue of Clergy Notes, we examine how Hispanics-the fastest growing group of immigrants in America-are shaping the religious culture here in Indianapolis. Today in the city there are Catholic, United Methodist, ...
  • Unknown author (1998-01)
    For many congregations, the boundaries that traditionally kept them apart – or aloof – from the wider community have been crumbling. Enclaves once defined by denomination, neighborhood, ethnicity, or class may find that ...
  • Unknown author (1997-08)
    What influences the relation between congregations and their neighborhoods? You'll find you end up with a handful of questions. But good questions are more interesting than pat answers.
  • Unknown author (2000-03)
    A number of congregations in Indianapolis sponsor weekly or monthly meetings at the lunch hour. Most are located downtown, and they attract workers and business people, the homeless, and others seeking a brief spiritual ...
  • Unknown author (1998-09)
    The better I get to know the faithful people of the congregation I serve, the more I’m convinced they have deep yearnings and aspirations to make a contribution to the common good. They wonder what knowledge and energy ...

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