Religion & Community 1995-2001

 

Religion and Community was a regular newsletter published by The Polis Center that related general findings of the Project on Religion and Urban Culture and provided updates regarding the project. This newsletter was intended for a general audience.

It was published from September 1995 to March 2001. Each issue has a topical title.

Recent Submissions

  • Unknown author (1995-06)
  • Unknown author (1995-09)
    This issue of Religion & Community highlights how Polis has worked with local religious educators. Various Polis projects have uncovered a wealth of information on the way religion has shaped the city—and how the city has ...
  • Unknown author (1996-04)
    The Project on Religion and Urban Culture is discovering how and where religion rubs shoulders to create community in Indianapolis. We are working with neighborhoods to learn how religious institutions and people of faith ...
  • Unknown author (1996-09)
    Clearly, religion is an important source of social capital in this city. Yet it is not always so. Many churches and synagogues report sporadic attendance. Clergy feel isolated from their neighborhoods and from each other. ...
  • Unknown author (1997-04)
    What is the relationship of churches, synagogues, and mosques to their neighborhoods? The Polis Center's interest in these questions is more than academic. What we learn has important implications for public policy. Consider ...
  • Unknown author (1997-09)
    As part of the Project on Religion and Urban Culture, local artists spent much of the past year observing religion in Indianapolis and reflecting on its meaning. In 1998, Indiana University Press will publish Falling Toward ...
  • Unknown author (1998-04)
    The Polis Center has produced a six-part video series, Religion as a Window on Culture, that takes us "inside" various religions in Indianapolis. The impulse to religion is nearly universal. The videos suggest that what ...
  • Unknown author (1998-09)
    Hispanics, the fasting-growing group of immigrants in America, have only recently come to Indianapolis in significant numbers. Even today they may compose no more than two percent of the population and are widely dispersed ...
  • Unknown author (1999-06)
    At about 22 percent, Indianapolis has a typical proportion of African-Americans for a city of its size. The city has been and continues to be composed primarily of a white majority and a significant black minority. Given ...
  • Unknown author (2000-04)
    Bringing their youth into the community and tradition of the faith is a primary concern for most congregations. Sabbath school, recreation and social groups,and rites-of-passage classes prepare young people for adulthood ...
  • Unknown author (2000-06)
    Congregations have become an agent for economic growth, particularly in inner-city neighborhoods. More than 20 percent of Indianapolis congregations are involved in programs to provide long-term benefits to residents, ...
  • Unknown author (2000-09)
    The Charitable Choice Provision of the Welfare Reform Act of 1996 enabled congregations to compete for federal dollars as providers of social services. For all the press that Charitable Choice has received, surveys show ...
  • Unknown author (2001-01)
    For generations, newly arrived settlers to Indianapolis have maintained their sense of community by reestablishing here the culture and religion of their homelands. In recent years, the city has received numerous immigrants ...
  • Unknown author (2001-03)
    Trends in American culture are producing significant changes in the clergy. Many feel put in the position of managing a small business, rather than a being pastor. At the same time, schools of theology labor under the ...

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