Browsing Research Notes 1997-2001 by Title

Sort by: Order: Results:

  • Farnsley, Arthur E. II (1998-04)
    The average Indianapolis pastor is a 50-year-old male. Full-time ministry is usually his second career. He is currently at his fourth ministerial post. These are some of the raw facts that emerge from the initial scan of ...
  • Quern, Susannah R.; Parks, Dawn L. (2001-02)
    How are congregations currently involved in providing social services? Does charitable choice make a difference? Our analysis describes the program activities of 400 congregations in 17 urban and suburban neighborhoods. ...
  • Diamond, Etan; Farnsley, Arthur E. II (1997-05)
    We know from contemporary surveys of religious affiliation what the religious landscape of contemporary Indianapolis looks like. In the 1990s, Catholics are the single largest religious group, with Black Baptists and ...
  • Wedam, Elfriede (1999-08)
    More than forty years after the civil rights movement began to mobilize against racial segregation, religious congregations continue to reflect the segregation Americans experience in their voluntary associations in general. ...
  • Diamond, Etan (1999-04)
    Until the middle of this century, people’s conceptions of proximity and distance were closely correlated. Things physically nearby were perceived as “close,” while physically distant places were “far.” But changes in ...
  • Mirola, William A. (2000-11)
    As religious and community leaders, clergy have joined the political battles over slavery, Prohibition, civil rights, the anti-war movement, and abortion. Recently, The Polis Center sponsored a telephone survey to explore ...
  • Wedam, Elfriede (2000-09)
    Using the categories devised by Robert Franklin, we examined an array of worship styles and social-political stances among approximately 100 African-American congregations in Indianapolis. We found little evidence of the ...
  • Diamond, Etan (1999-12)
    Religious commuting—the act of driving to church in another neighborhood or even on the other side of the city—has been part of the metropolitan experience since the early 20th century. Surveys have consistently shown that ...
  • Mapes, Mary (1999-06)
    What is most striking about faith-based social welfare in the 20th century is not its decline but its continued presence. Despite the widespread fears of many that an expanded welfare state would result in a less vibrant ...
  • Farnsley, Arthur E. II (1999-01)
    During the last few decades, cities have redefined their boundaries to include their metropolitan areas. Greater Indianapolis, defined by economic and social interdependency, is a nine-county region of which Marion County ...
  • Mirola, William A. (2000-05)
    Since 1995, the Polis Center has been engaged in exploring the ways that religious organizations and people of faith shape community life in Indianapolis. In studying seventeen neighborhoods around the metro area, we have ...
  • Farnsley, Arthur E. II (1997-02)
    Most people sense that Indianapolis is a typical, mid-sized American city with traditional values, values presumably drawn from a representative sample of American religious traditions. But how closely does this "Crossroads ...
  • Farnsley, Arthur E. II (1997-08)
    The Project on Religion and Urban Culture employed 33 high school, college, and graduate school students to help us learn about religion’s role in shaping Indianapolis. The majority of them spent their summer as part of a ...
  • Unknown author (2001-04)
    The final issue of Research Notes hosted a special roundtable discussion at The Polis Center, inviting researchers involved in the Project on Religion and Urban Culture to discuss what has been learned in the preceding ...
  • Farnsley, Arthur E. II (1998-09)
    Neighborhoods in Indianapolis, as in every city, are concerned about community development. The desire for economic growth, necessary social services, and residential stability is universal. Scholars and policy-makers have ...
  • Farnsley, Arthur E. II (1997-08)
    Do congregations think and act locally? Does it matter whether congregations are, or intend to be, anchors for the neighborhoods surrounding their houses of worship? Catholics maintain parishes, but even when boundaries ...
  • Farnsley, Arthur E. II (1997-12)
    In many neighborhoods, the majority of worshippers and clergy do not live in the area surrounding their church or synagogue. Most Christians believe they are called to love and to serve their neighbors. But must "neighbors" ...
  • Farnsley, Arthur E. II (2000-03)
    If we expect congregation to assume a larger role in providing public services, we must begin with realistic expectations, based on a fair accounting of the enormous breadth and variety among congregations as organizations. ...

Search eArchives


Browse

My Account